12-October-2004 -- Catholic World News Brief |

Share |

EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT REJECTS CATHOLIC NOMINEE

Brussels, Oct. 12 (CWNews.com) - A committee of the European parliament has voted against the nomination of an Italian Catholic political scientist, Rocco Buttiglione, to serve as justice minister for the European Commission.

Buttiglione had enraged gay-rights activists during a nomination hearing, when he said plainly that he believed homosexual acts were sinful. A devout Catholic who is a personal friend of Pope John Paul II, Buttiglione became a lightning-rod for opposition by leftists in the European parliament.

The future of Buttiglione's nomination is now in question. The parliamentary civil-rights committee, which voted narrowly (27-26) against him, does not have the final say. The president of the European Commission, Jose Manuel Durao Barroso, could still choose to give Buttiglione the justice ministry, or some other spot on the European Commission, and Barroso told reporters that he still has confidence in Buttiglione. However, the vote prompted several influential European leaders to recommend that Buttiglione's nomination should be dropped entirely.

Italian President Silvio Berlusconi, who had put forward Buttiglione's name, said that the parliamentary vote "reeked of fundamentalism." And a prominent Vatican prelate said that the rejection of an active Catholic was a "discriminatory act." Cardinal Francesco Pompedda, the retired prefect of the tribunal of the Apostolic Signatura, told the Italian daily La Stampa that the rejection of Buttiglione's nomination is "not the only worrisome sign coming from Europe," and suggested that the political climate showed an "excess of secularism." "I don’t see why someone who professes the Catholic faith, and holds to his own ideas, cannot be considered" for a spot on the European Commission, the cardinal said. He complained that "affirming the principles in which you believe should not be a reason for rejection."

If the decision by the parliamentary committee stands, Cardinal Pompedda said, "then people with opposing ideas cannot be nominated." Any opposition to secularism, he suggested, could become a disqualifying factor for any European politician.

Click here to share this news story with a friend.


 

Back to List

One of the largest collections of Church documents in the world

 

 

HOME - EWTNews - FAITH - TELEVISION - RADIO - LIBRARY - MULTIMEDIA
WHAT'S NEW - GENERAL - RELIGIOUS CATALOGUE - PILGRIMAGES - ESPA�OL

Terms of Use    Privacy Policy