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religious syncretism
Question from vicentinha rebelo on 10/18/2012:

"The religious situation of the Roman Empire was one of syncretism"What does that mean ? Do we see any parallels for the Catholic Church or our world today?

Answer by Fr. John Echert on 10/30/2012:

I am not sure where this quote comes from but religious syncretism refers to mixing together elements from multiple religions or sources. In the case of the Romans, they drew heavily upon Greek mythology and gave the gods and goddesses and other figures Roman names in place of Greek names. In general, there was an openness to adding additional gods and goddesses of other peoples as well, either with the assumption that appeasing other gods would further protect them, to avoid alienating gods, or simply out of a fascination and interest in a variety of other philosophies and religions. The monument to an unknown God to which St. Paul refers, as recorded in Acts, is an example. This monument was there to honor any gods that the local population may have missed, to appease them. But St. Paul, after attempting reason with those gathered there, resolved to preach ONLY Christ and Christ crucified.

No, there is not a parallel in the one true Church, which is built upon the long tradition of true religion and not a combination of false religions.

Father Echert

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