CHAPTER 132 — INTRODUCTION TO THE THREAT POSED BY PORNOGRAPHY
American Life League

Pornography and sadistic violence debase sexuality, corrode human relationships, exploit individuals, especially women and young people, undermine marriage and family life, foster anti-social behavior, and weaken the moral fiber of society itself.

"Pornography and Violence in the Communications Media: A Pastoral Response."[1]

Anti-Life Philosophy.

Most sexually explicit material is completely harmless. In fact, if it is free of violence against women, it is actually good for society, because it is a "cathartic:" Instead of carrying out violent acts, possible sexual offenders may simply fantasize about these acts and will therefore not be tempted to actually commit them.

What Is Pornography?

There must be no coarseness, or salacious talk and jokes all this is wrong for you.

                                                                                                       Ephesians 5:4.

The court system in this country has heard hundreds of cases whose central feature was the attempted definition of pornography. Learned men and women wrangle constantly over the definition of pornography, usually with no enduring result.

However, one common-sense definition would be that porn is "the literature of sexual deviance." In other words, it is literature that mentally sick and sexually maladjusted individuals enjoy reading.

Psychiatrists have identified about sixty different specific types of sexual deviance, or "paraphilias," including sado-masochism, homosexuality, fetishism, transvestitism, pedophilia, group sex, necrophilia (a sexual obsession with dead bodies), and bestiality. Each of these perversions has its own specialty magazines, videos, clubs, newsletters, and films. This vast body of literature and film can be defined as pornographic in one sense or another, in that it depicts extreme or unusual violence and/or sexual practices.

Pornography is a $20 billion per year industry in this country alone, and more than 200,000,000 issues of the 800 most popular soft-core and hard-core pornography magazines are sold every year.

Chapters 132 to 138 examine the various types of pornography that are freely available today, the effects of such material on society, and how concerned citizens may band together to fight the plague of perverted literature.

A Permanent Lupercal.

Pornography is men's control of women.

                                                                                                Andrea Dworkin.[2]

The Old Paganism Revisited.

Thousands of years ago, the Romans dissipated their pent-up desires for depraved activity on a single annual holiday called Lupercal. On this day everyone, including the most respected leaders, would indulge themselves in the activities they considered forbidden for the rest of the year: Rape, adultery, homosexuality, bestiality, child molestation, and literally any other sexual perversion that crossed their minds. There were no legal or social sanctions on this day, no matter how violent or bizarre the acts committed.

There is no need for such a holiday in the United States now. We have Lupercal every day. No other age or society can 'boast' of as many serial sex murderers, robberies, rapes, divorces, or drug overdoses as the United States in the Twentieth Century. Both this age and this country are saturated with filth. There is a total lack of protection of the weak and innocent. Even the sanctity of human life itself is held up to contempt and ridicule. The most powerful weapon used by the anti-life movement against our 'traditional' values is sexual propaganda in the form of both 'hard-core' and 'soft-core' pornography. If society is saturated with the depiction of perverted acts, these acts will no longer be perceived as immoral or unusual.

We have seen the effects of this propaganda campaign, whose purpose is to numb the conscience of the members of society.


References: Introduction to Pornography.

Pornography is violent propaganda against women.

                                                                                              Susan Brownmiller.[2]

[1] "Pornography and Violence in the Communications Media: A Pastoral Response." Letter from the Vatican's Pontifical Commission for Social Communications, May 16, 1989.

[2] From Eugene E. Russell. Webster's New World Dictionary of Quotable Definitions (2nd Edition). New York: Prentice-Hall, 1988. 674 pages.


Further Reading: Introduction to Pornography.

Melvin Anchell, M.D. Sex and Insanity.
Halcyon House, Portland, Oregon, 1983. Order from Christian Family Renewal, Box 73, Clovis, California 93613. Reviewed by Murray Norris, Ph.D., J.D., on page 27 of the November 1983 issue of ALL About Issues. A Freudian psychiatrist presents logical arguments against pornography, comprehensive sex education, moral relativism, and other peculiarities of our sex-crazed society.

Greenhaven Press. Censorship: Opposing Viewpoints.
Greenhaven Press Opposing Viewpoints Series, Post Office Box 289009, San Diego, California 92128-9009. 1985, 234 pages. Each section includes several essays by leading authorities on both sides of each issue. The questions asked are: "Should There Be Limits to Free Speech?;" "Is School and Library Censorship Justified?;" "Should the News Media Be Regulated?;" "Does National Security Justify Censorship?;" and "Should Pornography Be Censored?" Authors include Nat Hentoff, Phyllis Schlafly, Senator Bob Packwood, the American Library Association, the American Bar Association, and the Association of American Publishers. A catalog is available from the above address and can be obtained by calling 1-(800) 231-5163.

Greenhaven Press. Sexual Values: Opposing Viewpoints.
Greenhaven Press Opposing Viewpoints Series, Post Office Box 289009, San Diego, California 92128-9009. 1983, 155 pages. Each section includes several essays by leading authorities on both sides of each issue. The questions asked are: "Is Nonmarital Sex Acceptable?;" "Does Sex Education Belong in Schools?;" "Is Homosexuality Acceptable?;" "Is Pornography Harmful?;" and "Should Prostitution Be a Crime?" Authors include Jeremiah A. Denton, Jr., Susan Brownmiller, Gail Sheehy, and Phyllis Schlafly. A catalog is available from the above address and can be obtained by calling 1-(800) 231-5163.


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This is a chapter of the Pro-Life Activist’s Encyclopedia published by American Life League.


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